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Stoichiometry is the basis for chemical calculations

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Hello. Actually post a question about gas stoichiometry. Then the other day I put a ballistic motor on my motor and got really fucked by the mixture on which I have been rolling 10 thousand km. In petrol mode, mix 15.5 on gas 20.

Comments 23

in the case of a turbo engine, stoichiometry is relevant only in a dono charge. and then not always.

let's try to deal with the evidence.
as far as I understand, no one tuned the car, the couple was screwed in the brains and agony. therefore, most likely the setting is on the mafa, which means that the DMRV is lying with us and shows less air to the brains than it actually enters. Likely reasons:
1. Lying DFID
2. the flowmeter tube of the wrong diameter for which the dmrv is calibrated
3. has a hole in the intake

My understanding is that you can drive on gas much more fun than on gasoline. but ... if you do tuning purely for gas - driving on gas tuning with gas will lead to a motor engine. Therefore, I would make a dual-mode firmware for driving on gas and gasoline.
Further - would transfer the car to a map. On the map of FSUs for holes in the inlets and drips of the DMRV.

As far as I know, there is a teframod for Mitsubishi and there is a Russian shaman who is engaged in modding Mitsubishi firmware - pisyakot

Well, and accordingly, you need a competent tuner, so that the tachan infernally fell))) Good luck.

Threat selection of components for gas on a turbo is a very crucial moment, then it may be too late to hope for a motor resource of more than 40-50 thousand

Pisyakot is not ready to remotely roll the card, there is dual-mode firmware, there is no time to roll back.

remotely roll back gas, it seems to me, not a single sane person will ...

Yes, do not roll back the gas. A map map)

But what's the problem with rolling a map card? two or three hours with a broadband ... if there is no time - write down a log with the actual and requested mixture and correct the scaling mafa ...

Tom, I don’t know how. And Stas has not yet shared the firmware.

in the case of a turbo engine, stoichiometry is relevant only in a dono charge. and then not always.

let's try to deal with the evidence.
as far as I understand, no one tuned the car, the couple was screwed in the brains and agony. therefore, most likely the setting is on the mafa, which means that the DMRV is lying with us and shows less air to the brains than it actually enters. Likely reasons:
1. Lying DFID
2. the flowmeter tube of the wrong diameter for which the dmrv is calibrated
3. has a hole in the intake

My understanding is that you can drive on gas much more fun than on gasoline. but ... if you do tuning purely for gas - driving on gas tuning with gas will lead to a motor engine. Therefore, I would make a dual-mode firmware for driving on gas and gasoline.
Further - would transfer the car to a map. On the map of FSUs for holes in the inlets and drips of the DMRV.

As far as I know, there is a teframod for Mitsubishi and there is a Russian shaman who is engaged in modding Mitsubishi firmware - pisyakot

Well, and accordingly, you need a competent tuner, so that the tachan infernally fell))) Good luck.

Threat selection of components for gas on a turbo is a very crucial moment, then it may be too late to hope for a motor resource of more than 40-50 thousand

you somehow complicated described ...
1set up the car on gasoline.
2 you make a mixture on gas identical to gasoline in different modes, with the only difference being that on gas the mixture is poorer by 1-1.2 units.
3 you can make the angle a little more evil.

A bit of history

The very word "stoichiometry" is an invention of the German chemist Jeremiah Benjamin Richter, proposed by him in his book, which first described the idea of ​​the possibility of calculations using chemical equations. Later, Richter's ideas received theoretical justification with the discovery of the laws of Avogadro (1811), Gay-Lussac (1802), the law of constancy of composition (J.L. Proust, 1808), multiple ratios (J. Dalton, 1803), and the development of atomic-molecular theory. Now these laws, as well as the law of equivalents formulated by Richter himself, are called the laws of stoichiometry.

The concept of "stoichiometry" is used in relation to both substances and chemical reactions.

Stoichiometric equations

Stoichiometric reactions are reactions in which the starting materials interact in certain proportions, and the amount of products corresponds to theoretical calculations.

Stoichiometric equations are equations that describe stoichiometric reactions.

The stoichiometric coefficients (equation coefficients) show the quantitative relationships between all participants in the reaction, expressed in moles.

Most inorganic reactions are stoichiometric. For example, three sequential reactions for producing sulfuric acid from sulfur are stoichiometric.

By calculations using these reaction equations, you can determine how much each substance needs to be taken to get a certain amount of sulfuric acid.

Most organic reactions are non-stoichiometric. For example, the ethane cracking reaction equation looks like this:

However, in fact, the reaction will always produce different amounts of by-products - acetylene, methane and others, which are theoretically impossible to calculate. Some inorganic reactions also cannot be calculated. For example, the decomposition reaction of ammonium nitrate:

It goes in several directions, so it is impossible to determine how much you need to take the starting material to get a certain amount of nitric oxide (I).

Stoichiometry is the theoretical basis of chemical production

All reactions that are used in chemical analysis or in production must be stoichiometric, that is, subjected to accurate calculations. Will a plant or a factory bring benefits? Stoichiometry makes it possible to find out.

Based on stoichiometric equations, a theoretical balance is made. It is necessary to determine how much starting material is required to obtain the right amount of the product of interest. Next, operational experiments are conducted that will show the actual consumption of the starting materials and the yield of products. The difference between theoretical calculations and practical data allows us to optimize production and evaluate the future economic efficiency of the enterprise. Stoichiometric calculations, in addition, make it possible to draw up a heat balance of the process in order to select equipment, determine the mass of the resulting by-products that will need to be removed, and so on.

Stoichiometric substances

According to the law of consistency proposed by J.L. Proust, any chemically pure substance has a constant composition, regardless of the method of preparation. This means that, for example, in a molecule of sulfuric acid H2SO4 regardless of the method by which it was obtained, two hydrogen atoms will always have one sulfur atom and four oxygen atoms. Stoichiometric are all substances having a molecular structure.

However, substances are widespread in nature, the composition of which may differ depending on the method of preparation or source of origin. The vast majority of them are crystalline substances. You could even say that for solids, stoichiometry is the exception rather than the rule.

As an example, consider the composition of well-studied carbide and titanium oxide. In titanium oxide TiOx X = 0.7–1.3, that is, from 0.7 to 1.3 oxygen atoms per titanium atom, in TiC carbidex X = 0.6–1.0.

The non-stoichiometry of solids is explained by a defect of penetration in the nodes of the crystal lattice or, conversely, by the appearance of vacancies in the nodes. Such substances include oxides, silicides, borides, carbides, phosphides, nitrides and other inorganic substances, as well as high molecular weight organic.

And although evidence of the existence of compounds with variable composition was presented only at the beginning of the 20th century by I. S. Kurnakov, such substances are often called bertollides by the name of the scientist K.L. Bertollet, who suggested that the composition of any substance changes.

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